Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art
Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art
Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art
Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art
Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art

Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art

Regular price $14.90
/

Artwork Design

Cotton Tea Towel with Australian Indigenous Art

62.5cm x 42.5cm

These beautiful cotton tea towels are printed with beautiful indigenous art, created by artisans from Better World Arts, a Fair Trader of Australia. The artwork on each tea towel has a story that is provided by the artist, who receives royalties for each piece sold.

Better World Arts sources art from Aborginal artists across Australia. They send details plans of the art to artisans around the world. Artisans interpret the plans into their own indigenous medium (handicraft). Better World Arts then distribute the results across Australia and internationally. This generates generous royalties for the artists and sustainable comes for artisans. 

Below are the stories of the artwork on each of the designs available. 

Two Dogs Dreaming by Murdie Nampijinpa Morris

Two dog ancestors a Jampinjinpa and a Napangardi, travelled from the west to the east. They dug holes in the ground and created 'warnim' (rockholes) and 'ngapa' (waterholes) as they went. The two dogs separated. Eventually Jampijinpa became lonely and howled for Napangardi in the south. She came running to him, and they married each other at Ngarnka.

Puurda man Wanakiji Jukurrpa by Paddy Stewart

This design shows the Yam and Bush Tomato Dreaming. You can see the Yams and the small round berries of the Bush Tomatoes. In the Dreamtime the people used to eat these fruits and vegetables, just as our old people lived off them. The artist painted this painting to teach the children. 

Bush-tail possum Dreaming by Stephen Jupurrula Nelson

This story comes from a big hill called Mawurrji, west of Yuendumu and north of Pikilyi (Vaughan Springs). A group of 'janganpa' ancestors resided there. Every night they would go out in search of food. Their hunting trips took them to Wiriki and Wanapirdi, where they found 'pamapardu' (flying ants). 

Family and Country by Damien & Yilpi Marks

This is a teaching painting, describing an dry season in Mount Liebig, in the Northern Territory. Women & children collect bush potatoes & prepare for inma (ceremony). A man, wait, sits down with his waru (spear). Controlled burnings are taking place as the spinifex is dry, and this means good fruits can grow.